LED Spinner!

So I want to add some kind of visual indication that my main arduino loop is still well, looping. I decided on an LED “spinner”, kind of like on web pages and applications. but how to do it?

After a lot of searching I found something neat. A decade counter.

Seems this nice little IC (4017) has 10 outputs that go high in a sequence when given a pulse. The perfect thing to do when you want LEDs to “chase” or spin.

I hope to add this to the new LCC. Should help indicate that the main loop is still looping!

Detailed info on a similar “chaser” project here.

 

LCC v5 is almost ready

Lots of code changes and some hardware. Here’s some of them:

  • Added ShiftBright RGB LED to pins D2, D12 and D13
  • Added code for ShiftBright
  • Updated DEBUG routines
  • Day overhead handling is updated to wait longer before turning off
  • Added yellow and red LED indications for day overhead conditions
  • Night cold conditions are mirrors of day as appropriate
  • Switch 1 is now only for UV lights
  • Switch 2 is only for heat- in my case the heat rock is on all the time and the heat lamp is switched
  • Cleaned some functions of unneeded statements

Version 5 should be released soon. It’s still not running live yet. If you want an advance copy let me know.

Using a Transistor to Control an LED or anything

For my LCC project I decided to use a 2N4401 NPN transistor to control status LEDs and AC Switches. I did this so that the power draw from the Arduino chip would be as low as possible.

Below is a diagram of how this works. I used a 2N4401 NPN transistor that “turns on” when the gate goes high or positive. This essentially allows it to switch the negative or ground leg of the circuit. I did this because the Arduino can’t turn a digital IO line to ground- just 0v or 5v. Continue reading “Using a Transistor to Control an LED or anything”

LCC Breadboard Visual

Below is the breadboard circuit diagram. It’s pretty final. I hope to clean it up a bit when the project is final.

The major additions in this rev is that I’m using transistors against the Arduino digital outs to control the AC relays and a corresponding LED indicator.  The on/off switches in those circuits provide a bypass to turn on the AC switches if necessary.