My Original Thunder Tiger Raptor 30 Nitro

raptor_rc_helicopter2

Found these old photos of the first Raptor 30 I flew circa 2003. Back when we could get 20 minutes of flight on one tank…remember those days? Yes, those are real wooden blades….an OS .30 engine, a remote glow plug attachment, a gigantic gyro and full mechanical linkages/mixing, oh and don’t forget the milk carton plastic canopy that you couldn’t paint…. Totally old school but oddly, you’ll notice that many of TT’s designs are still in use today like the belt drive and general head design (for flybars). Enjoy.

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Multimedia Library Server

I’ve always used iTunes to manage my sharing and remote playing of my media library within my home.

As you no doubt know, iTunes sucks at sharing/streaming media. I used iTunes because it was the path of least resistance despite all the verbal abuse I’ve hurled at it…it’s bloated, slow, crashes etc…but that’s a whole different article….😉

Enter Plex. My Padawan at work turned me on to the Plex Media Server and my media consumption has been upgraded beyond my wildest imagination.

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Allow Root to SSH for Ubuntu

This is the most insecure thing you can do to your linux system. That said however, when working on development systems at home I like to logon as SSH. Granted this is behind a firewall to a linux system with no access from the internet.

This was tested on Ubuntu 14.x on a Raspberry Pi.

I do this out of laziness. NEVER do this to an internet accessible system.

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Text To Email Addresses

I often need to send text messages but my only way to send is via email. No worries. All carriers have a email version of your phone number that convert emails to texts. Here is how to figure out your email to text address:

  • AT&T – cellnumber@txt.att.net
  • Verizon – cellnumber@vtext.com
  • T-Mobile – cellnumber@tmomail.net
  • Sprint PCS – cellnumber@messaging.sprintpcs.com
  • Virgin Mobile – cellnumber@vmobl.com
  • US Cellular – cellnumber@email.uscc.net
  • Nextel – cellnumber@messaging.nextel.com
  • Boost – cellnumber@myboostmobile.com
  • Alltel – cellnumber@message.alltel.com

Some Cellular Device Terminology

Cellular devices have many numbers associated with them, especially with respect to the SIM cards. Here’s a short list to keep them straight:

IMEI stands for International Mobile Station Equipment Identity and is used to identify 3GPP (also known as GSM (AT&T, TMobile, UMTS and LTE devices/networks) and iDEN mobile phones, as well as some satellite phones. It is usually found printed inside the battery compartment of the phone and often on the box the phone came in (think iPhone), but can also be displayed on-screen on most phones by entering *#06# on the dial pad, or alongside other system information in the settings menu on smartphone operating systems.

The IMEI is part of the phone, not the SIM card so swapping SIM cards won’t change the IMEI. (Kind of like a serial number)

ICCID stands for Integrated Circuit Card ID. This is the identifier of the actual SIM card itself – i.e. an identifier for the SIM chip. It is possible to change the information contained on a SIM (including the IMSI), but the identify of the SIM itself remains the same.

This allows you to swap SIM cards between phones and makes GSM style phones more convenient to use when you break your phone and want to swap it with a spare.

SIM stands for subscriber identification module and is basically the serial number of the card that you put in your GSM phone.

SIM cards come in many sizes, currently they are:

SIM card Introduced Standard reference Length (mm) Width (mm) Thickness (mm) Volume (mm3)
Full-size (1FF) 1991 ISO/IEC 7810:2003, ID-1 85.60 53.98 0.76 3511.72
Mini-SIM (2FF) 1996 ISO/IEC 7810:2003, ID-000 25.00 15.00 0.76 285.00
Micro-SIM (3FF) 2003 ETSI TS 102 221 V9.0.0, Mini-UICC 15.00 12.00 0.76 136.80
Nano-SIM (4FF) early 2012 ETSI TS 102 221 V11.0.0 12.30 8.80 0.67 72.52
Embedded-SIM JEDEC Design Guide 4.8, SON-8 6.00 5.00 <1.0

UICC is the physical card most users refer to as a SIM. It stands for Universal Integrated Circuit Card. The SIM is a circuit component of this card.

Hope that helps. It’s shocking how the carrier customer service reps have no idea what any of this is an always ask you to read the longest number possible when they know full well the don’t need it….